“Hadji Girl”; #Iraq // #Syria // #Afrin // #HumanRights // #Dehumanisation

Hadji Girl – Wikipedia – “Hadji Girl” is a song by Corporal Joshua Belile of the United States Marine Corps about a fictitious encounter with a family of Iraqis. A video of Belile performing the song was posted anonymously on YouTube.com in March 2006. It sparked controversy at a time when Marines were facing public scrutiny over the killings in Haditha. YouTube subsequently removed the video from their site, rejecting any further uploaded versions as violating the site’s terms of use.

In the song, the Marine protagonist comes under fire and takes cover in a nearby Burger King where he meets an Iraqi girl who convinces him to follow her to her house. After arriving, the Marine is confronted by the Iraqi girl’s father and brother who are armed with AK-47 rifles. The Marine then uses the girl’s younger sister as a human shield. The father and brother attack, killing the sister, as the Marine laughs maniacally. The Marine then hides behind a TV, returns fire, and kills the father and brother. Cheers and clapping from the unseen audience can be heard in the background of the video.[1]

Belile later said the song was meant only as a joke based on lines from the film Team America: World Police, and apologized to those who were offended by its content.[2] The performance, according to Belile, was at Al Asad airbase in Iraq, where Belile’s helicopter gunship unit was posted until March 2006. In the video, Belile is wearing parts of a uniform, although not enough to characterize him as “in uniform” as no nameplate or national markings are visible. The US military, like many others, allows service members and military employees to pursue their own interests when not in uniform.

He was later exonerated of all wrongdoing.

Hadji Girl

I was out in the sands of Iraq
And we were under attack
And I, well, I didn’t know where to go.

And the first thing that I could see was
Everybody’s favorite Burger King
So I threw open the door and I hit the floor.

Then suddenly to my surprise
I looked up and I saw her eyes
And I knew it was love at first sight.

And she said…
Durka Durka Mohammed Jihad
Sherpa Sherpa Bak Allah
Hadji girl, I can’t understand what you’re saying.

And she said…
Durka Durka Mohammed Jihad
Sherpa Sherpa Bak Allah
Hadji girl, I love you anyway.

Then she said that she wanted me to see.
She wanted me to go meet her family
But I, well, I couldn’t figure out how to say no.

Cause I don’t speak Arabic.

So, she took me down an old dirt trail.
And she pulled up to a side shanty
And she threw open the door and I hit the floor.

Cause her brother and her father shouted…
Durka Durka Mohammed Jihad
Sherpa Sherpa Bak Allah
They pulled out their AKs so I could see

And they said…
Durka Durka Mohammed Jihad
Sherpa Sherpa Bak Allah
(with humorous emphasis:)
So I grabbed her little sister, and pulled her in front of me.

As the bullets began to fly
The blood sprayed from between her eyes
And then I laughed maniacally

Then I hid behind the TV
And I locked and loaded my M-16
And I blew those little f*ckers to eternity.

And I said…
Durka Durka Mohammed Jihad
Sherpa Sherpa Bak Allah
They should have known they were f*ckin’ with a Marine.


By Sheldon Rampton / Center for Media and Democracy // The Hatred Behind ‘Hadji Girl’ | Alternet

If you want to understand why the war is going so badly in Iraq, it may help to examine the recent reaction to “Hadji Girl,” the videotaped song about killing Iraqis by U.S. Marine Corporal Joshua Belile. The song became controversial when the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) discovered it on the internet and objected to its lyrics. “Hadji Girl” tells the story of a soldier “out in the sands of Iraq / And we were under attack”:

Then suddenly to my surprise
I looked up and I saw her eyes
And I knew it was love at first sight.

And she said…
Dirka Dirka Mohammed Jihad
Sherpa Sherpa Bak Allah

Hadji girl I can’t understand what you’re saying.

The girl says that she “wanted me to meet her family / But I, well, I couldn’t figure out how to say no. / Cause I don’t speak Arabic.” They visit her home, a “side shanty” down “an old dirt trail,” and as soon as they arrive,

Her brother and her father shouted…
Dirka Dirka Mohammed Jihad
Sherpa Sherpa Bak Allah

They pulled out their AKs so I could see

… So I grabbed her little sister and pulled her in front of me.

As the bullets began to fly
The blood sprayed from between her eyes
And then I laughed maniacally

Then I hid behind the TV
And I locked and loaded my M-16
And I blew those little fuckers to eternity.

And I said…
Dirka Dirka Mohammed Jihad

Sherpa Sherpa Bak Allah
They should have known they were fucking with a Marine.

The song is gruesome, to be sure, and CAIR complained that it celebrated the killing of Iraqi civilians. The video shows Belile performing the song before a laughing, applauding audience of fellow soldiers at their base in Iraq. Recognizing that the song could only bring bad publicity, U.S. military officials promptly issued a statement saying that it was “clearly inappropriate and contrary to the high standards expected of all Marines.” Belile also apologized, saying the song was intended as “a joke” and that he didn’t intend to offend anyone.

ANF | Kongreya Star launches #WomenRiseUpForAfrin campaign – Friday, 9 Feb 2018, 00:05

Kongreya Star, the Kurdish Women’s Movement of Rojava, launched the global solidarity campaign #WomenRiseUpForAfrin on Thursday.

The organization called on the women of the world to join the campaign and to defend the women’s revolution against Turkey and its gangs’ attacks.

Here is the full text of the statement in English:

“The Kurdish region of Afrin in the Democratic Federation of North Syria has been under heavy attack from the Turkish army and affiliated jihadist gangs since 20th January 2018.

Night and day, our towns and villages, refugee camps, and historic and sacred sites are being bombed by Turkish warplanes and artillery with the aim of depopulating and occupying the area. While the international public has not taken any adequate action, every day we face new war crimes and civilian casualties. Women have become targets of rape, cruel sexual assault and mutilation of their bodies by the Turkish army and affiliated gangs.

By Tom O’Connor On 3/15/18 // Rape Is a Weapon of War Wielded Against Girls and Women in Syria, U.N. Report Says – [newsweek.com] Rape has been used as a weapon by those fighting in Syria’s seven-year civil war and others preying on refugees fleeing the conflict, according to the United Nations. Based on interviews with 454 survivors, relatives of victims, defectors, medical professionals, lawyers and members of affected communities, the 29-page report found widespread abuses committed since the March 15, 2011 uprising against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

The unsung roots of Women’s Revolution in Rojava – The Region – by Gamze Kafar 15/01/2018 12:31


Kurdish women have pioneered the developments in northern Syria since 2012. They transformed the ‘Arab Spring’ into a ‘People’s Spring’, and in the midst of the chaos of war, they seized the chance to wrest their own destiny from the hands of others. Throughout their own revolutionary process, women have taken on a leading role in many fields, from the defense of the homelands against Islamic State (IS) to daily politics, and from education to diplomacy. The atmosphere of the revolution has allowed women to broaden the space for extensive discussions on gender equality and women’s self-defence. The conflict in Syria has shifted traditional roles within communities, and more women are starting to play leading roles in politics at all levels. This process, called the Rojava Revolution, has been commonly referred to as ‘the Women’s Revolution’. Women from many parts of the world have joined the resistance of the Kurdish women against IS and have proudly become part of the growing feminist movement in the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria, commonly known as Rojava.

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