Solitude and the Abolition of Slavery: Commemorative Art in Guadeloupe II – Repeating Islands

Solitude and the Abolition of Slavery: Commemorative Art in Guadeloupe II – Repeating Islands

Solitude was freed in the first abolition of 1794 but, after Napoleon restored slavery in the French colonies in 1802, she became a maroon and joined freedom fighters Delgrès and others. She is always remembered as a fierce and fearless warrior, expertly wielding a machete against the French troops. She watched her friends die in battle on May 26, 27 and 28.  When Delgrès and his comrades died in an explosion, Solitude was among them and was seriously injured. She was captured and sentenced to death but because she was pregnant, she could not be put to death. She was executed after she gave birth on November 29, 1802. No one knows the whereabouts of the child. Solitude´s story illustrates the too often forgotten role of women in the struggle against slavery.

For more information and photo, see http://www.comite-memoire-esclavage.fr/spip.php?article144

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