Beware the Angry Uncle Tom

Sheriff David Clarke directed officers to hassle man after brief exchange on plane: report | TheHill — The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that Clarke and the man, 24-year-old Dan Black, had a brief verbal exchange aboard an American Airlines flight in January. Clarke claims that Black asked him if he was Sheriff Clarke.

Clarke’s claims come as a response to a lawsuit filed by Black against Clarke, Milwaukee County and several unnamed deputies, according to the Journal Sentinel.

After Black and Clarke’s exchange, Clarke sent a text message to Captain Mark Witek telling Witek what to do with Black.

“Just a field interview, no arrest unless he becomes an asshole with your guys,” Clarke wrote. “Follow him to baggage and out the door.” “Question for him is, why he said anything to me,” Clarke continued. “Why didn’t he just keep his mouth shut?”

Black says he was detained, interviewed and escorted out of the Milwaukee airport by six deputies after the incident, according to the report.

After Black filed a harassment complaint against Clarke, Clarke taunted Black on his Facebook page.

“Cheer up, Snowflake,” the post read, which included a photo of Black. “If Sheriff Clarke were to really harass you, you wouldn’t be around to whine about it.”


Bice: Sheriff Clarke directed staff to hassle plane passenger after brief exchange

The sheriff explained in the text what should be done when Riverwest resident Dan Black got off the plane.

“Just a field interview, no arrest unless he become an asshole with your guys,” Clarke wrote Captain Mark Witek. “Question for him is why he said anything to me. Why didn’t he just keep his mouth shut?”

“Follow him to baggage and out the door,” Clarke continued. “You can escort me to carousel after I point him out.”

A copy of the text messages was  provided by an attorney for Black, who is suing the sheriff, Milwaukee County and several unnamed deputies over the incident.


Sheriff David Clarke plagiarized portions of his master’s thesis on homeland security

Clarke, a visible surrogate for Trump during the campaign known for his incendiary rhetoric, earned a master’s degree in security studies at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. In his thesis, “Making U.S. security and privacy rights compatible,” Clarke failed to properly attribute his sources at least 47 times.

In all instances reviewed by CNN’s KFile, Clarke lifts language from sources and credits them with a footnote, but does not indicate with quotation marks that he is taking the words verbatim.

According to guidelines on plagiarism posted on the Naval Postgraduate School’s website, “If a passage is quoted verbatim, it must be set off with quotation marks (or, if it is a longer passage, presented as indented text), and followed by a properly formulated citation. The length of the phrase does not matter. If someone else’s words are sufficiently significant to be worth quoting, then accurate quotation followed by a correct citation is essential, even if only a few words are involved.”

The school’s honor code defines plagiarism as “submitting material that in part or whole is not one’s own work without proper attribution. Plagiarism is further defined as the use, without giving reasonable and appropriate credit to or acknowledging the author or source, of another person’s original work, whether such work is made up of code, formulas, ideas, language, research, strategies, writing or other form(s).”

Sources Clarke plagiarized include a 2002 ACLU report about “The Government’s Demand for New and Unnecessary Powers After September 11,” a 2003 ACLU report critical of the FBI’s records-collection practices, a 2007 ACLU report on “fusion centers,” and a 2011 ACLU report on the need to overhaul secrecy laws.

Other sources Clarke lifted words from include: the 9/11 Commission Report, a 2011 article in the Homeland Security Affairs journal, the Pew Research Center, a 2012 report by the Constitution Project, a 2003 report by the US General Accounting Office, a 2011 Brennan Center report, a 2013 Washington Post article about the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, Comparative Homeland Security: Global Lessons, a textbook by Nadav Morag, and Safe Cities Project, a research paper published by the Manhattan Institute.

Clarke also lifted language from former President George W. Bush’s book, “Decision Points.”


Sheriff David Clarke: Who is the Milwaukee County firebrand? – CNNPolitics.com

Clarke hasn’t been shy either with his views on turmoil in Milwaukee after last summer’s police shooting of an armed black man named Sylville Smith. He called protests that turned violent “black cultural dysfunction.”
In an opinion piece the sheriff wrote for The Hill, he likened the chaos in Milwaukee as “tribal behavior.”
“What happened … had little to do with police use of force — it was a collapse of the social order where tribal behavior leads to reacting to circumstances instead of waiting for facts to emerge,” Clarke wrote.
“The law of the jungle replaced the rule of law in Milwaukee … over an armed career criminal suspect who confronted police.”

“This anti-police rhetoric sweeping the country has turned out some hateful things inside of people that are now playing themselves out on the American police officer,” he said.
Clarke has frequently blamed the Black Lives Matter movement for inspiring violent crimes against law enforcement officers, calling the group “purveyors of hate.”

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