‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ Inspired By Fugitive Slave, Professor Says

In his book, Jackson recalls the encounter with Stowe, mentioning her by name.”She took me in and fed me, and gave me some clothes and five dollars. She also inspected my back, which is covered with scars which I shall carry with me to the grave. She listened with great interest to my story,” he wrote.In Stowe’s letter to her sister, the original of which is in the Beineke Library at Yale University, Stowe notes the effect that night had on her family.”There hasn’t been anybody in our house who got waited on so abundantly and willingly for ever so long. These negroes possess some mysterious power of pleasing children for they hung around him and seemed never tired of hearing him talk and sing,” she wrote.In a recent interview, Ashton said: “Was it Jackson who was hidden by Stowe as a fugitive in Brunswick Maine? I’m 99.9 percent sure. That seems absolutely true. I think he was an inspiration for the novel. I think his pain touched her and helped her to act.”Ashton said after “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” was published, a lot of blacks and former slaves wanted to meet Stowe and sought her endorsement.

via ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ Inspired By Fugitive Slave, Professor Says.

via ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ Inspired By Fugitive Slave, Professor Says.

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