Excerpt: Do American Negroes Dream of Alabaster Sheep?: An Indigenist Deconstruction of African Assimilationist Pathologies & Other Anti-Colonialist Writings | Radio Utopie

The Native then attempts to negotiate his freedom by angling
between the other invading Europeans for a weaker master. In the end,
these efforts fail and the Native is forced right back into servitude
with the first European that claimed to own him. Just like in real life,
this Native is not ignorant to the real plight of his predicament:
o
This island’s mine, by Sycorax my mother,
Which thou tak’st from me. When thou cam’st first,
Thou strok’st me and made much of me, wouldst give me
Water with berries in’t, and teach me how
To name the bigger light, and how the less,
That burn by day and night; and then I lov’d thee,
And show’d thee all the qualities o’ the isle,
The fresh springs, brine-pits, barren place and fertile.
Curs’d be I that did so! All the charms
Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on you!
For I am all the subjects that you have,
Which first was mine own king.
Caliban, (Act I of ‘The Tempest’)
o
If Shakespeare is truly the best there is in the English language,
why have these social commentaries not been utilised broadly to deal
with the issue of ethnic bias and racism in the English-speaking
colonial world? What excuse could there possibly be for using the
Judeo-Christian Bible to discuss racialism when Shakespeare’s insight
made much more sense? Examined objectively, the Christian holy book, any
version, remains to be the most dangerous, genocidal, racist and
anti-Female literary work available in the western world.
Very few other collections of written theology even come close to the
level of brutality found in the ‘Good Book’. And it does not take a
rocket scientist to understand the role of religion and its influence,
both good and bad, on European ideas of race, ethnic bias and the wholly
ethnocentric pseudo-science of Eugenics.

via Excerpt: Do American Negroes Dream of Alabaster Sheep?: An Indigenist Deconstruction of African Assimilationist Pathologies & Other Anti-Colonialist Writings | Radio Utopie.

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